Fishing-and-Recreational-Gambling-Tall-Tales-at-Sea

Fishing & Recreational Gambling: Tall Tales at Sea

Fishing and recreational gambling is more about the experience than about winning a lot of money. Financial gain only comes second to the exhilarating experience. For most people these are recreational activities for fun and entertainment. Fishing and gambling have recreational benefits found in the excitement of taking a chance and winning. The fun is in the thrill of winning and being with friends while fishing or gambling. Both leisure activities involve some level of risk. They can cause problems when they become addictive. Fishing addiction and compulsive gambling can be destructive to families, friendship and careers.

Fishermen run the risk of recreational gambling when they are at the sea. Gambling at sea  is not a completely new phenomenon. Riverboat gambling has been a part of history. In the past riverboats offers casino gambling. Riverboats would sail down the river or lake while providing gambling opportunities. Modern riverboats are casinos with gaming parlours for casino games such as blackjack, baccarat, roulette, and slots. Many of these boats are barges marooned on a river never leaving the dock. Today gambling at seas are conducted in cruise lines with bigger and more elaborate on board casinos. The ships ranging from main stream to luxury all have casinos. Sea based casinos are hot places to play but online gambling is getting hotter with offers of free bets by bookmakers.

Fishing and recreational gambling have many similarities. The fisherman’s analogy explains the behavioural aspects of gambling. Some of the similarities are the following:

  • Fishing is an addictive activity just like gambling. Once you caught a fish you go fishing more frequently. Once you win you gamble more often.
  • One bite or win isn’t enough you need do it again to experience the thrill.
  • Bait casting is like repetitive forms of gambling. You repeat the same action again and again in the hope of winning.
  • Fishing and gambling is both exciting and relaxing at the same time.
  • You easily forget time when you fish or gamble and you tend to play longer than you intended.
  • When one line is not catching anything you try a new one. Just like gambling, you try a new table or a new casino.
  • Using the first fish as bait hoping to catch a bigger fish.
  • Casting a line is like pulling a penny slot. Both are easy and there’s a chance of catching a big fish or winning.
  • Bites and nibbles of fish that doesn’t get hooked are near wins just like gambling.
  • Catching a fish is like a winning moment on gambling.
  • Success is both a mixture of skill and chance in fishing and gambling.
  • At the end of the day you forget about addition when you brought something home.

Every person can make a choice whether to gamble or not and how to reduce the risk of gambling addiction. Low-risk gambling is done for social reason mostly with family, friends or colleagues. Recreational gambling is often combined with entertainment and food. Any amount spent on gambling should be considered an entertainment cost. Developing a set of personal guidelines for low-risk gambling involves setting a schedule on when and how much to gamble. Some people who wish to stop gambling addiction find recreational fishing to be a good substitute leisure activity. They only risk losing time not money in fishing and they get the same high they experience in gambling.

Dwindling Fish Stocks or Plenty in the Ocean?

There are conflicting reports about the state of our oceans and waterways. Some say that fish stocks are seriously dwindling and others that there are plenty of fish in the ocean. Environmentalists tend, generally, to play the crisis card again and again. Green groups cry out about the disappearance of Orange Roughy stocks and many other aquatic species being in immanent peril. Commercial fishermen declare that fishing is their livelihood and that special consideration should be given to their requirements. Recreational fishing associations are also quite vocal about their rights when it comes to casting a line in the sea. Government agencies are often caught in the middle, attempting to find that fine line that stalks the shoals of compromise.

Dwindling Fish Stocks or Plenty in the Ocean?

Who do we, as Joe Public, believe? All of these sections of society have vested interests in the outcome of any debate about the future of fishing and fish stocks. I should have also mentioned the scientists, who are often employed by the government agencies responsible for managing territorial waters and their aquatic stocks. The marine scientists would say that it is their science that measures the true state of global fishing stocks and the health of waterways.

One of the strongest, and in some ways unspoken, arguments underpinning the debate about fishing, is the traditional right of humans to fish the seas for their food and profit. Even recreational fishermen feel that they should be able to go out and hook a catch of fish to feed their families when they want to. It was something their fathers and grandfathers had always done. This archetypal fisherman still exists in the minds of many human beings.

Up against this emotive and instinctive argument is the scientific evidence of over-fishing in our oceans. The huge commercial trawlers that scoop up tonnes of fish from the sea floors and net everything they possibly can. For many recreational fishing people, this is not fishing, it is more like mining the sea. Environmental groups abhor these large commercial concerns and feel that they are raping and pillaging our oceans. In some ways it is like these operators have been given free bookmaker bets on the race to empty our oceans of fish.

A seafood diet is considered a healthy diet, with all that Omega 3 essential fatty acid content. Fresh seafood is relatively expensive to buy in most Western cities. There is, however, a prevalence of cheaper seafood sourced from Asia and Africa, which may be the results of third world production costs or something worse. There is no doubt that our seas need careful monitoring by impartial government bodies and their international equivalents, if we are to continue enjoying the sport and fruits of our oceans and waterways.